Category Archives: Workshops

Selection 3

‘Freedom to Dream’ @ Aadharshila Home

“I want to complete my education and become a big man one day” – Participant, Aadharshila Home

“I have always wanted to help people and with my work, I’ve managed to fulfill that dream” – Member, Child Welfare Committee

Be it the young, or the younger, everyone dreams. Our dreams connect us to our innocence and light, that makes us one with our being.

The Foundation, on August 25, 2017, conducted a Capacity Building workshop at the Delhi Judicial Academy for members of Child Welfare Committee, Juvenile Justice Board and organisations that work in the sphere of Juvenile Law. A small and engaging performance by the boys from the Adharshila Observation Home titled ‘Khwaabon ke Par’, was followed by an Art activity that engaged all stakeholders on one platform and share their dreams with each other.
A magical afternoon turned surreal because of the interactions that helped everyone understand and empathize with one another. It also promised to bring back the same innocence within all participants that helped them remember their lifelong dreams and aspirations. As our country completes 70 glorious years of its independence, we hope to continue our work with ‘Youth at Risk’ and find ways to connect the young ones with their light, their humility and their passion.
We would thanGauri Saxena, Mona Sharma and Pankaj Gupta for making this event possible.  We would also like to thank our guest facilitators Bani MalhotraTavishi Krishna and Ankita Dasgupta for their contribution towards the workshops!
Picture Credits- Aarushi
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The Compassionate Gaze

Last year we began our journey of moving deeper within urban slums and communities in Delhi. Our work with ‘Juveniles in Conflict with Law’ had taken us to a different spectrum of urban life in the city. But it is always important to go back to places that have equipped us to take the next step in the field of Social Arts.

The Adharshila Observation Home for Boys has been that space. It is an area where urbanisation, migration and the law interact at complex levels. The recently amended ‘Juvenile Justice Act’ (2015) has changed the discourse on crime and punishment for years to come. The merits and demerits of the act continue to be heavily debated.

As one of the tenets of punishment, we strongly believe in the power of reformation and the ability of legal institutions to engender change. The Observation Home in Kingsway Camp has been one such institution where this transformation is being realized. All our visits to the home so far have increaseed fatith in our own work and the role Expressive Arts can play in the process of self-learning and self-growth.

This experience has been incredibly satisfying. Although we have been working in the Observation Home for the better part of the decade, the connection with the children this time is special. We started working with a group of 15 inmates in the first week of May towards a workshop that will culminate in a performance at the Delhi Judicial Academy. We are exploring the idea of ‘Dreams, Delinquency and Destitution’ in the context of ‘Youth at Risk’. The time spent so far has also revealed a lot that needs to go in working towards the issue of mental health and diverting public opinion towards a more compassionate gaze.

We started our workshops by introducing the children to basic theatre warm-ups and creative exercises before slowly moving on to ‘childhood dreams and aspirations’. Once we got to this playful core, the task ahead become easier and smoother. Participants shared their stories, circumstances, future goals, inhibitions and restrictions that have shaped their lives today. We also explored enabling oneself to overcome these barriers and look for respect where it matters the most: to the Self.

This connection of course, comes with its own set of challenges and precautions. We do not believe in any hierarchy and genuinely consider this process to be a mutual one.

Expressive Arts is a tool that allows one to go beyond the defined realm of conversation and thought and make room for a deeper probe into issues of identity formation, that the youth struggle with today.

Working at the Home only strengthens our resolve in the core vision of the Foundation, that of equity and social justice. We do hope that this time spent can only pave way for more work in the future that is centred on the idea of healing and empowerment.

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Experiences with Papier Theatre

My introduction to Papier Theatre – and how I Survived!

Raju, Matia, Sonu… unforgettable characters spring forth from the pages of Shyamal Kumar Pramanik’s short story “Survival”, to share their gnawing hunger and degrading struggle to survive. Not an unfamiliar “Dalit” story. Yet they come home with me every night.

I have signed up for a Papier Theatre workshop for 3 weeks mid March, not actually being a puppeteer! From making documentaries, corporate films and Television programs for 20 years, I had gone back to my first love Theatre and was enjoying exploring its power as a tool to communicate and empower. At the core of it all was the consuming fire of storytelling, and as I realized, the greater the skill of the teller, the more magical the story.

“Alain Lecucq and Nargis Majd are Master Puppeteers, who will be focusing on the dramaturgy of the story, on the “What”, “Why” and “to Whom” you want to communicate with. You would enjoy it”. Anurupa’s words have me hooked!

I send in my application, get an acceptance and for the next 3 weeks, starting 14th March, I jump into my car at 8am and zip down the highway from Gurgaon, to make it on time for the 9:30 workshops at the Crafts Museum. This means no morning walks or exercise but such is my enthusiasm, that everything else is put on hold for 3 weeks. Of course I will pay the price of excruciating cervical pain once we go back to our “normal” lives, but I am so much richer for the experience!

It is an enchanting 3 weeks of stepping into a fairy tale world of make believe and watching it come alive! Starting with making simple paper stages and stories from personal experiences, we are exposed to some mind boggling videos of shows that Alain has done as well some of the most creative and innovative ones from across the world. I remember crawling back to the workshop space feeling most disheartened and almost embarrassed about what we had presented on the first day. The Bar of Excellence has suddenly gone so high, we have not even made our first baby steps!

Alain and Nargis are amazing as they alternate between being teachers, parents, guides and friends, adding to the warm bonhomie that has developed within the group. Starting with 11 participants, 9 of us complete the course, exploring 4 different stories through completely different formats.

My team mate Binitesh and me choose to work on Pramanik’s story “Survival”and spend the first few days diving deep into the themes and sub themes that the story opens up for us. Out of the 5 to 6 strands that seem to flow through the story, we have to crystallise our thoughts to choose one Central idea that will be our touchstone for all the creatives thereafter.

Wading through the complexities the story throws up for each one of us, we struggle to define that simple connecting thread, little realizing how important this will be, in keeping our entire presentation true to our central theme.

As I put pencil to paper and start allowing the story to flow into the storyboard, it comes alive in a way I have not experienced before – so simply and so quickly. I am Raju, fighting against the bitter cold, to feed and protect my wife and son – Matia and Sonu. It is my mother who has died an excruciating death while my father watches helpless in the famine, and I am determined this will not be the fate of my child.

Bini and me discuss, argue, agree, work together, reflect individually, share our thoughts and arrive at a consensus most times. It is fascinating to see a baby being crafted by two completely different individuals, drawn to a common theme, and to see it evolve from paper sketches into human characters as we draw and colour and fix them to cardboard sliders with “spines” glued to their backs.

Our little wooden stage is built by a carpenter simultaneously and as backdrop after backdrop slides into its slot on our stage, the characters or “paper puppets” glide on to share their tale of desperation and sheer grit to stay alive. At our final presentation at the India International Center, we add the magic of sound effects and focussed lighting and I am told that the effect is quite mesmerising. “Where would we be taking this show from here” is a question I am asked by many members of the audience.

Yes, where indeed would I be taking the show? Bini has gone back to Mumbai to teaching at his Film Institute, but I do have Raju and Matia and Sonu with me, who sit in my office room and look at me questioningly everyday! I owe it to them, to Alain and Nargis, to Ranjana and Anurupa, to our wonderful group who worked together and to Bini and me, to keep them alive and introduce them to all those out there who want to receive them.

Ah, the forest beckons and I promise we shall all walk through it again – soon!

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Puneeta Roy is Managing Trustee at the Yuva Ekta Foundation

 

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Community Theatre Workshops in Jahangir Puri

The Yuva Ekta Foundation conducted a 2 week-long theatre workshop with students of Govt. Co Ed. Senior Secondary School, K Block, Jahangir Puri. These workshops were conducted in the month of May, and mark the beginning of the second phase of our Community Outreach Project in the area. The Foundation has been trying to build a community base since July 2015, and these workshops were a marvellous experience.

We worked with 80 students from school in 2 batches for girls and boys separately. The workshops culminated in 2 distinct interactive performances that covered everyday issues in Jahangir Puri and their link with larger socio-economic problems. These performances were then showcased to the parents of the participants on 28th May, 2016. What followed was an intense discussion on relevant community issues which were portrayed and discussed through the use of Playback Theatre, by facilitators from The Foundation.

We would like to thank The Directorate of Education for granting us permission to conduct these workshops. We would also like to thank the school staff for helping us throughout this project.

We are on-course to build a network of community members. A pilot project that started with a group of 25 women, now includes more than 200 families.

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Theater and Art Workshop at Aadharshila Juvenile Remand Home

In December 2015, the Yuva Ekta Foundation in association with Action Aid facilitated a week- long theater workshop at the Aadharshila observation home for boys. Working with a core group of 40 juveniles, we sought to evoke a sense of dignity and self respect in the boys we were working with, even as we created an opportunity for them to share their stories, so that they could step back and reflect on why they slipped into crime, and henceforth make responsible choices.

We started our workshops with ice-breaking workshops, wherein we connected with the boys using a variety of Theater Games and Physical/Vocal Warm-ups. With the help of activities like ‘Mirror Exercise’, we focused on forming connections within the boys using eye contact.

Once we had established a comfort level with the boys, we used Art and Creative Writing to share their stories and important people in their circles of influence, including their friends, families and society at large.

Our one-week project  culminated in a small performance for all inmates at the home, Honorable Justice Rajiv Shakdher, JJB Magistrate Mr. Vishal Singh, Ms. Sehjo Singh from Action Aid, representatives from CII Foundation, TDH and Delhi Legal service Authority.

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The Young Visionary 2015- Community Outreach

We started on a Monday morning with a group of young kids who were perfect strangers to each other, yet once we got the ball rolling, the students caught on magically and opened up to each other. 

Using various theatre based exercises as tools, we worked on sensitising the mixed group of students from grade 11, Bluebells School International and the Khushi Home for Girls in Okhla on the issue of Waste Management.
 
Over the 3 days, students from the two groups have worked as a team on creating a small performance depicting everyday scenarios on Waste in our homes, in our streets and beyond our dustbins.
 
These young people have individually shown immense growth and as a team have evolved a strong voice about the issue of waste. The group is now going to meet once a week to rehearse and plan performances of the play.
 
We’d like to thank the teachers from Bluebells and the administrators of Khushi for the opportunity to work with a group of such talented, bright young people, who have so much potential, yet to be discovered and honed.

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Community Theatre Workshops

We have been working at the Juvenile Observation Homes in the Sewa Kutir Complex, Kingsway Camp, for 6 years now. Through a number of Theatre and Art workshops we have broken ground with several young inmates, empathised with their heart breaking stories and hoped that the seeds being sown would bear fruit soon, hopefully guiding them towards a more meaningful future.

However we realised that our time with them at the home is too short – barely a month before they are released on bail. What is to be done for a long term impact?

We have to go to the Source – to their homes and work with their families. We begin to find ways to penetrate into this community. It took over 3 months of networking, of following different leads, some which end up as dead ends! But slowly, we start making our connections. We focussed on the women, the mothers of the boys we have worked with in the Observation Home. Regular visits to their houses to explain our intent, started building trust and bit by bit, the pieces started falling into place.

The workshops were held in a small hall in a boisterous government school as the women respond and turned up out of curiosity. Some brought their daughters and together we pushed boundaries as the community space grew into one of warmth and laughter!

The workshops were a delightful experience of sharing stories and lightening their burden as we introduced them to basic concepts of theatre and role play!

Day 1: Ice breaking, introductions. Getting to know each other’s names and backgrounds and speaking about the issues they deal with everyday in Jahangirpuri

Day 2: Art and writing, starting with their names and symbols of things they like, to introduce themselves in a deeper manner. Then we broke into a group of women talking about their childhood and the difference they feel in themselves today. The children’s group drew and spoke about the images of the ‘Jahagirpuri of their Dreams”

Day 3: We started with some movement work, loosening up and connecting with each other deeper. The mirror exercise, connecting with finger tips and back supporting exercise were very intense experiences for the women, one of them even broke down on receiving such unconditional love and warmth. Then each group did a role play on scenes they see inside their homes.

Day 4: We worked more on movement through a dance exercise, which continued into a story telling exercise. We then created role plays in groups- the women worked on expressing anger and issues of substance abuse as a theme and the children chose socially relevant issues like cleanliness and violence against women.

Day 5: Being the last day, we worked more on physical movement through another dance exercise and did a waste recycling workshop using newspapers to make pens. We wrapped up with a creative visualisation and feedback session, vowing to meet again in the near future. They took back the pens as a souvenir from the workshops.

These past few days have been quite a revelation and we haven’t even touched the tip of the iceberg as we have just begun to connect with these amazing women and their children! It is almost difficult to believe that such a workshop was possible in Jahangir Puri, the very same resettlement colony that always seemed so fraught with tension and fear. We intend to take forward this work that we have begun in Jahangir Puri over the past few months.

 

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Yuva Ekta Summer Workshops

We start our 9th Edition of the Yuva Ekta Summer Workshops.

As summer approaches, we gear up for our new batch of Theater for Change workshops!

The swift urbanization and globalization of modern trade has helped the world progress. In its course it has also led to extensive waste that needs to be managed effectively. With the increase in wastage over the years, a massive attention has been drawn to ‘Effective Waste Management’ practices.

Understanding the need of the hour, Theater for Change workshops this year will focus on ‘Solid Waste Management and Sustainability’. Under the guidance of experts from the field and through Theater, students from different schools and NGOs will come together to understand and explore Solid Waste Management and Environment sustainability, in compliance with Prime Ministers ‘Swachh Bharat Abhiyaan’.

The workshops will culminate into a Street Play that will be taken to the common man through performances in various public places and institutions.

Last date for enrolling 18th May. Hurry limited seats!

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The Boy Who was Afraid to Sleep

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The Yuva Ekta Foundation in collaboration with the Kahaani Festival and the One World College of Music stages its production “The Boy Who was Afraid to Sleep” on the 16th of May at the One World College of Music.

Join us on a journey of self discovery and dream spaces with Adi, Bella and their friends. The play encourages people to dream, to be imaginative, without being afraid or boxed into categories, without fear of judgement. While each child has a unique and colourful imagination, the play resonates with all age groups giving us an opportunity to connect with our inner child.

The 20 minute play then goes into a story telling workshop, where we use basic theatre, music, art and writing techniques, to help participants create stories and performances of their own.

Duration of Workshop: 2 hours (workshop and performances by groups)

Participants: Adults and Children together (Family Participation is encouraged!)

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Theater and Dance workshops at Aadharshila Home

The Yuva Ekta Foundation facilitated Expressive Arts based workshops with the Juveniles at the Adharshila Observation Home for boys in Kingsway Camp. The boys underwent a 15-days long intensive THEATRE and DANCE workshops, exploring their dreams and aspirations, and to understand better the circumstances these boys come from and the role and responsibility of society in shaping them.

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